Focus on the Deer

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

The most important player in hunting is the deer. You must focus on the deer at all times. Deer are fickle, changeable, impatient, and elusive. Too many hunters want the deer to adapt to their strategies. Nonetheless, it’s the deer who sets the pace and rhythm of the hunt and we must adapt to their movements.
-Jim

Why

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

The most important question you ask, to solve any problem, overcome any obstacle, or achieve any hunting goal is “Why?” Top hunters always ask the question “Why?” and then act on the answers that come to them. If you know “why” the “how-to’s” will reveal themselfs. It’s the “Whys” that tell us the “Hows”.

-Jim

Identifying Primary Scrapes

Apple Creek Whitetails Photo

Primary scrapes are used by several deer and are generally reopened season after season. They are often found on high ground, in funnels, and where one buck’s territory intersects that of another. Primary scrapes always have a licking branch above them and several rubbed trees in the vicinity. I’ve seen primary scrapes as small as 3 feet in diameter and as large as a sheet of plywood.
-Jim

Insanity

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

Most hunters want to hunt the same way their fathers did, only they want significantly better results.

If you hunt the way your father or uncle hunted, then you can’t expect to kill any more or bigger deer than they did.
Albert Einstein said, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”
We must be willing to change ourselves and the way we hunt if we expect to change our results.

-Jim

Patience

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

In a society that demands instant gratification, patience is a skill lost to most hunters. Few hunters can win a stare down with a buck. Fewer yet can wait patiently enough to harvest a good buck. Learning to be patient is a far more valuable skill than learning the right moves. Patience is the central requirement for you to become an ever more accomplished hunter.

-Jim

Do you have the heart of a hunter? (free gift)

Have you read my book “Buck Naked” yet? Since it’s release, I’ve received incredible feedback from readers raving about how this book has changed their hunting and enabled them to harvest bigger bucks more consistently.
If you haven’t heard of my book, or haven’t had a chance to check it out yet, I want to give you a chapter free. It’s titled “Inside a Deer’s Mind.”
I hope you enjoy it. Let me know what you think.

If you’re reading this email, then it’s already clear that you’re a hunting leader. Leaders stick out from the crowd, and for good reason.
Keep checking your email over the next few days because I’ll be sending you more free gifts.
In the meantime, don’t forget to read this chapter of my book for free.
Jim

https://www.idrive.com/idrive/sh/sh?k=r9h6v6d9l1

Google Earth

Good scouting uses a combination of both aerial and ground scouting. Google Earth has become an indispensable tool for trophy hunters. Not only will it give you a good idea where the brush patches are, but it also reveals food sources and travel funnels.

-Jim

The Stink Buck

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

The bucks, for their part, secrete their own strong hormones to help induce the females to ovulate. Researchers have long understood the effects of male odors on hormone levels in females, and have found that the length and timing of the menstrual cycles are markedly influenced by odors produced by males. This is why big bucks will always enter the field upwind of the doe herd. Not only does this promote estrous, but also the buck can visually detect even the slightest sign of sexual arousal his scent might be causing in the doe.

-Jim

The Difficult Part

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

The most difficult part of becoming a great hunter is making the commitment to be one. Trust me: it’s much more difficult to be an average hunter than it is to be a great hunter.

-Jim

Intuition Vs Analysis

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

You have a gut feeling and then you analyze it. Now it doesn’t seem like such a good idea.

Do you go with your gut feeling?

Or do you slip into analysis paralysis?

The challenge is not to talk yourself out of your intuition. The challenge is to defend your instinct and then go for it.

-Jim