Getting into Rhythum

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails


In trying to control our world, we tend to exclude ourselvesfrom nature. Of course, humanity exists only as part of nature.
Too often, hunters try to take charge of something that is not his or hers to take charge of. Success in the field is often determined
by a hunter’s ability to lose his or her ego, and get in step with natural rhythms.

All of nature is like a web. It is impossible to touch one part without the vibration being felt elsewhere. A man walking through the forest creates a great disturbance. I always feel two sizes too big for my skin whenever I move through the woods.

Most of the deer will be aware of the hunter’s presence and scurry off long before he sees them. What deer a human does see are usually bounding off with tails flagging. Getting into rhythm is a matter of letting go.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

Learning to see

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

All around us, we are surrounded by limits. Some see this as crippling and settle for something less. Others see the opportunities.

Most novice hunters spend too much looking for a big deer and not enough time seeing what’s right in front of their eyes. We have conditioned our minds to look for deer where we expect them to be and not necessarily where the deer want to be.

The trick is to see what’s around us without judgement. Our subconscious can process the information much faster than our conscious and we avoid having our preconceived notions blinding to the reality of the situation. Seeing, despite the name, isn’t merely visual. It’s also a feeling.

Only after we have truly seen an area for what it is can we apply judgement as to best approach on how to achieve our desired results.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

Learn to Backtrack


Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

Everything in nature happens for a reason. Deer use the same travel routes and inhabit the same patches of cover year in and year out for the same compelling reasons.

Backtracking deer is one of the fast tracks to hunting success. Through backtracking we can gain some wonderful insights into the local deer behavior. We learn where the buck has been and why. The secrets of when and how to intercept the buck will be reveled.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

http://jimcollyer.com/

Hunt Backwards

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

Most of us have been taught to start at the beginning and work towards the end. If we just follow the steps success will come. Unfortunately, this tends to be the long route to success.

Hunters who achieve consistent success do just the opposite. They start at the end and work backwards to the beginning. By doing so all of their efforts are aligned with the end result.

Start with where you plan to kill the buck, NOT how to kill the buck. Once we know the where, the how’s will revel themselves.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

Beggars can’t be choosers

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

If you’d rather be a chooser, enter the deer woods with the strength and confidence achieved through a knowledge and understanding of deer and deer behavior.

If all you have is the desire to kill a big buck, it’s not sufficient.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

Most advice is bad advice…

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

People mean well, especially friends and family, but they’re going to give you bad advice.

This leads to two challenges as you strive to improve your hunting success ratio:

1. Ignore their advice, and stick with the status quo (which probably hasn’t worked so well for you in the past)

and

2. Try to discern the actually useful good advice, so you don’t insulate yourself in a self-deluded sense of grandeur.

In general, good advice pushes you to go farther, or to do things that make you uncomfortable.

P.S. the irony of this post is not lost on me.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

Just when you think you’ve seen it all…

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

I’ve been hunting whitetails for over 45 years now and I thought I had seen it all. That was until a couple of years ago. There are those out there that seem to push the boundary between creative genius and peer insanity. And while I have to give them an A for effort and an A for ingenuity. I have to give them an F for utter foolishness.
I heard the two hunters coming long before I saw them. In fact, I saw several deer running from the hunters before I even heard the hunters. Although both of these fellows were wearing camouflage, they were hunting with the wind at their backs.
When they approached, I suggested that they might do better if they hunted into the wind instead of with the wind.
“We don’t have to worry about the wind direction,” the taller one said, “we are wearing scent controlling underwear and we sprayed ourselves down with scent shield.”
“Very well.” was all I could reply.
I guess they didn’t know that most human scent comes from our breath and the sebaceous glands behind our ears.
They went on their way and I looked for another place to hunt.
Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

Questioning the Questions

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

If you want a successful hunt, start with understanding. Understanding what’s present and what’s not present. Most of all, understanding how it all fits together and the opportunities that exist in both.

The best solutions to hunting problems don’t come from finding good answers to the questions that are presented.

They come from discovering new questions.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,

Jim Collyer

You missed another opportunity

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

With more people hunting trophy bucks than you can shake a stick at. You need to stay at the forefront. One of the biggest mistakes hunters make is to hunt the same exact area year after year. Yes, there are locations that can produce a trophy whitetail year and in year out, but they are few and far between.
It’s a matter of numbers only 1 out of 20 bucks will ever reach trophy status. Most areas Just don’t contain enough deer to produce trophies year in and year out. Once the buck pool is drained in one area. It is time to increase and improve our hunting efforts.
If there’s a shortage of bucks in your area, it is going to be rare to see big bucks.
What this tells me is that I need to double my efforts in scouting and locating new areas for big bucks.
If there is a big buck shortage we can’t miss a beat. How we scout will determine our success. If you want to improve and increase your hunting success, you’ll need to get out in the woods.
It’s that simple.
Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

But Which is the Sideshow?

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

Every year the hunting industry comes out with new products aimed at improving our hunting. But which of these products are the real deal and which are sideshows? Which ones offer long term benefits and which promise instant success.

Sadly, most are sideshows or mere distractions from what’s important to our success.

Hunting has been around as long as mankind and is the basis of all civilization. The tried and true tactics of our fathers and grandfathers are far more critical to our success than any new product.

What is the most important, urgent, and critical elements to your long term hunting success?

Grab a copy of the book

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim